Engine Suzuki K6A

The 0.6-liter 3-cylinder Suzuki K6A engine was produced by the company from 1994 to 2018 and was installed on almost all compact models of the concern, such as Alto, Wagon R and Jimny. In addition to the atmospheric version of the unit, there was a very popular turbocharged version.

Engines of the K-series: K6A, K10A, K10B, K12B, K14C, K14B, K15B.

In 1994, one of the most popular engines for compact Suzuki models debuted. By design, it was progressive for its time: there is a distributed fuel injection, a 3-cylinder aluminum block with cast-iron liners, an open cooling jacket here, an aluminum 12-valve DOHC cylinder head not equipped with hydraulic compensators and a timing chain. The motor was repeatedly upgraded, for example, it was the first in the K-series to receive a phase regulator.

There are a huge number of modifications of this power unit: simple atmospheric, economical Lean Burn, hybrid, gas, as well as with an IHI or Hitachi turbine and an intercooler.

Specifications

Production years 1994-2018
Displacement, cc 658
Fuel system distributed injection
Power output, hp 37 – 54 (atmospheric modifications)
60 – 64 (turbo modifications)
Torque output, Nm 55 – 63 (atmospheric modifications)
83 – 108 (turbo modifications)
Cylinder block aluminum R3
Block head aluminum 12v
Cylinder bore, mm 68
Piston stroke, mm 60.4
Compression ratio 10.5 (atmospheric modifications)
8.4 – 8.9 (turbo modifications)
Hydraulic lifters no
Timing drive chain
Turbocharging no (atmospheric modifications)
yes (turbo modifications)
Recommended engine oil 5W-30, 5W-40
Engine oil capacity, liter 2.9
Fuel type petrol
Euro standards EURO 4/5
Fuel consumption, L/100 km (for Suzuki Jimny 2000)
— city
— highway
— combined
7.9
5.2
6.1
Engine lifespan, km ~250 000

The engine was installed on:

  • Suzuki Alto 4 (HA11) in 1994 – 1998; Alto 5 (HA12) in 1998 – 2004; Alto 6 (HA24) in 2004 – 2009; Alto 7 (HA25) in 2009 – 2014;
  • Suzuki Cappuccino 1 (EA11) in 1995 – 1998;
  • Suzuki Cervo 5 (HG21) in 2006 – 2009;
  • Suzuki Every 4 (DA52) in 2001 – 2005; Every 5 (DA64) in 2005 – 2015;
  • Suzuki Jimny 2 (SJ) in 1995 – 1998; Jimny 3 (FJ) in 1998 – 2018;
  • Suzuki Lapin 1 (HE21) in 2002 – 2008; Lapin 2 (HE22) in 2008 – 2015;
  • Suzuki MR Wagon 1 (MF21) in 2001 – 2006; MR Wagon 2 (MF22) in 2006 – 2011;
  • Suzuki Kei 1 (HN11) in 1998 – 2009;
  • Suzuki Palette 1 (MK21) in 2008 – 2013;
  • Suzuki Wagon R 1 (CT21) in 1995 – 1998; Wagon R 2 (MC21) in 1998 – 2003; Wagon R 3 (MH21) in 2003 – 2008; Wagon R 4 (MH23) in 2008 – 2012;
  • Mazda AZ-Wagon II (MD11) in 1998 – 2003; AZ-Wagon III (MJ21) in 2003 – 2008; AZ-Wagon IV (MJ23) in 2008 – 2012;
  • Mazda Carol IV (HB12) in 1998 – 2003; Carol V (HB24) in 2004 – 2009; Carol VI (HB25) in 2009 – 2014;
  • Mazda Laputa I (HP) in 1999 – 2006;
  • Mazda Spiano I (HF) in 2002 – 2008;
  • Nissan Moco 1 (G21) in 2002 – 2006; Moco 2 (G22) in 2006 – 2011;
  • Nissan Pino 1 (HC24) in 2007 – 2010;
  • Nissan Roox 1 (ML21) in 2009 – 2013.

Disadvantages of the Suzuki K6A engine

  • Many engine modifications are equipped with an IHI turbine or a little less Hitachi, and with a disregard for the power unit, they rarely go more than 50,000 km. You need to change the oil regularly and let the engine idle after a trip.
  • The second most popular problem with this engine is a cylinder head gasket breakdown. Monitor the condition of the cooling system, pump and motorized fan.
  • According to the regulations, the timing chain changes every 90,000 km, but for active drivers, and especially in the version with a turbine, it stretches even earlier. And when it jumps, the valves bend.
  • On runs over 150,000 km, oil scraper rings usually already lie down and a small oil burner appears. Decarbonizing here most often will not help and replacement of the rings is required.
  • Detonation is very common when using low-octane gasoline in hot weather, grease leaks through the oil seals, and the ribbed belt tensioner bearing wedges. Do not forget to adjust the gaps, because valve burnout is an extremely common occurrence here.

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