Engine Renault F9Q (dCi)

The company assembled the 1.9-liter Renault F9Q or 1.9 dCi diesel engine from 1998 to 2012 and installed it not only on its models: such a unit is found on Suzuki, Mitsubishi and Volvo. Conventionally, three generations of the motor are distinguished under the environmental standards Euro 3, Euro 4, Euro 5, respectively.

F-series diesels also include: F8M, F8Q and F9Qt.

In 1998, a new 1.9-liter diesel engine debuted at the restyled Laguna, which was distinguished by the presence of a modern Bosch Common Rail fuel system. By design, it was quite a typical motor for that time with an in-line cast-iron block, an 8-valve aluminum head without hydraulic lifters, and a timing belt drive. There was no atmospheric modification, all versions were equipped with Garrett or KKK turbines.

The first engines with a Bosch CP1 fuel system and a conventional turbine developed from 80 to 107 hp, and in 2001 a 120 hp modification appeared, equipped with a variable geometry turbine. The second generation with Common Rail CP3 and injection pressure of 1600 bar started in 2005, such engines ranging from 110 to 130 hp supported more stringent Euro 4 environmental standards. Third generation engines with 130 hp and 300 Nm and support for Euro 5 issued until 2012.

The engine was installed on:

  • Renault Espace 4 (J81) in 2002 – 2006;
  • Renault Kangoo 1 (KC) in 2001 – 2005;
  • Renault Laguna 1 (X56) in 1998 – 2001; Laguna 2 (X74) in 2001 – 2007;
  • Renault Master 2 (X70) in 2000 – 2010;
  • Renault Megane 1 (X64) in 2001 – 2003; Megane 2 (X84) in 2002 – 2009; Megane 3 (X95) in 2008 – 2012;
  • Renault Scenic 1 (J64) in 2000 – 2003; Scenic 2 (J84) in 2003 – 2009; Scenic 3 (J95) in 2009 – 2011;
  • Renault Trafic 2 (X83) in 2001 – 2006;
  • Mitsubishi Carisma 1 (DA) in 2000 – 2004; Space Star 1 (DG) in 2001 – 2005;
  • Nissan Interstar 2 (X70) in 2003 – 2005; Primastar 1 (X83) in 2002 – 2006; Primera 3 (P12) in 2003 – 2006;
  • Opel Vivaro A (X83) in 2001 – 2006;
  • Suzuki Grand Vitara 2 (JT) in 2005 – 2015 (as F9QB);
  • Volvo S40 I (644) in 2000 – 2004; V40 I (645) in 2000 – 2004 (as D4192T3).

Specifications

Production years 1998-2012
Displacement, cc 1870
Fuel system Common Rail
Power output, hp 80 – 120 (1 gen.)
110 – 130 (2 gen.)
130 (3 gen.)
Torque output, Nm 180 – 270 (1 gen.)
260 – 300 (2 gen.)
300 (3 gen.)
Cylinder block cast iron R4
Block head aluminum 8v
Cylinder bore, mm 80
Piston stroke, mm 93
Compression ratio 18.3 – 19.0 (1 gen.)
18.3 (2 gen.)
17.0 (3 gen.)
Hydraulic lifters no
Timing drive belt
Turbocharging yes
Recommended engine oil 5W-30, 5W-40
Engine oil capacity, liter 5.5
Fuel type diesel
Euro standards EURO 3 (1 gen.)
EURO 4 (2 gen.)
EURO 5 (3 gen.)
Fuel consumption, L/100 km (for Renault Laguna 2003)
— city
— highway
— combined
7.5
4.5
5.6
Engine lifespan, km ~500 000
Weight, kg 177

Disadvantages of the F9Q (dCi) engine

  • The resource of this motor depends on the condition of the oil pump, which wears out quickly, from which its performance drops. Oil starvation greatly reduces the life of the liners, up to 60,000 km.
  • The Bosch fuel system is very reliable, only the booster pump often breaks down, but the O-rings of the injection pump wear out at high mileage and it starts to leak. Your engine can also be very dull due to a clogged fuel pressure regulator.
  • The turbine is demanding on the quality and quantity of lubricant, does not tolerate oil starvation and a clogged air filter. Often the solenoid valve of its control fails.
  • Not only is the oil separator not very good here, but condensate also collects in the breather. In winter, it can freeze, oil will begin to press into the intake and your diesel engine will go into spacing.
  • As often as possible, here you need to check the condition of the drive belt of mounted units. When it breaks, it falls under the timing belt, the marks of which go astray and hi overhaul.
  • There are enough other problems here: the flow meter often fails, the EGR valve clogs and sticks, the crankshaft position sensor fails, the wiring rots and breaks.

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