Engine Mercedes M104 E32

Mercedes Benz М104 is a 6-cylinder in-line engine with a cast iron block with a volume (respectively) of 3.0 l and 3.2 l with variable valve timing. Replaced a motor marked M103. On engines without an ignition distributor, the intake camshaft was equipped with an electro-hydraulic clutch to change the valve timing. Continue reading Engine Mercedes M104 E32

Engine Mercedes M272 KE30

The Mercedes-Benz M272E30 engine was introduced to the public in 2004, when it was first installed on the R171 SLK350 car. The new engine had a V6 configuration and had 3.0 liters of displacement at its disposal. This engine replaces the outdated E32 and E37 engines from the M112 series. Continue reading Engine Mercedes M272 KE30

Engine Mercedes M272 KE/DE 35

The M272 E 35 power unit was the evolution of the Mercedes V6 and was supposed to replace the M112 E32 and M112 E37. In addition to the 3.5-liter engine, the lineup includes the 2.5-liter M272 E25 and the 3.0-liter M272 E30. The development of the 272 series was carried out on the basis of the M112, which includes an aluminum BC with a camber of 90 degrees and 106 mm between the cylinders. Continue reading Engine Mercedes M272 KE/DE 35

Engine Mercedes M273 E55/E46

The Mercedes M273 engine debuted in the S-class car in the fall of 2005 and was subsequently installed on the E-, S-, CLS-, R-, CL-, SL- and CLK-class models, as well as off-road vehicles of the ML, GL and G series. family of gasoline V-shaped 8-cylinder internal combustion engines from Mercedes-Benz. Continue reading Engine Mercedes M273 E55/E46

Engine Mercedes M113 E50

The M113 E50 engine is an unusually lightweight, compact engine (unlike its predecessor M119) was a continuation of the line of three-valve M112 engines. The engineers added two more to the six cylinders and got the M113. Due to its compactness, it was installed on all rear- and all-wheel drive Mercedes models. Continue reading Engine Mercedes M113 E50

Engine Mercedes M119 E50

The 5.0-liter power unit M119 E50 became the first in the M119 family and is located in a row between the younger version of the E42 and the sports modifications of the E60 AMG and E63 AMG. In the new engine, a 90-degree aluminum bore was used, plus pistons from light alloys and forged connecting rods were used. Continue reading Engine Mercedes M119 E50

Engine Mercedes M104 E28

The M104 E28 engine is a 2.8 or 3.2 liter inline 6-cylinder engine. There was also a 3.6-liter AMG version. The engine had two camshafts and 4 valves per cylinder. On engines without an ignition distributor, the intake camshaft was equipped with an electro-hydraulic clutch to change the valve timing. Continue reading Engine Mercedes M104 E28

Engine Mercedes M104 E30

The M104 E30 engine had 2 overhead camshafts, with 4 valves per cylinder. The shafts were driven by a roller chain. There was a variable valve timing. As you know, sports cars had such a scheme of all kinematics. Motors Mercedes M104 E30 have proven to be reliable devices (with minor flaws). Continue reading Engine Mercedes M104 E30

Engine Mercedes M112 E28

The Mercedes M112 engine is a family of V6 engines that were widely used in the 2000s. Released in 1998, the Mercedes M112 was the first V6 ever built by Mercedes. Some time later, the Mercedes M113 V8 engine was designed on its basis. All M112 engines were built in Bad Cannstatt, Germany, except for supercharged versions from AMG – E32 AMG, which were assembled in Affalterbach, Germany. Continue reading Engine Mercedes M112 E28

Engine Mercedes M112 E37

In 2002, another version of the M112 engine appeared – the E37 with a volume of 3.7 liters. This option is recognized as the largest in the series. To increase the volume, the BC was changed for a piston with a large diameter. The cylinder head does not differ from the base M112: it has one camshaft and 3 valves per cylinder. The head uses the IFGR system, hydraulic lifters and an intake manifold with an adjustable length. Continue reading Engine Mercedes M112 E37

Engine Mercedes M112 E32

In 1997, the new M112 E32 engine replaced the old E32 engine from the M104 series. The main difference between the new series and the old one was that now the motors became V-shaped with a breakup angle of 90 degrees. The move away from the in-line arrangement of the cylinders allowed the engine to be made more compact and to unify 6- and 8-cylinder engines as much as possible, which, in turn, made it possible to install both series of engines in the same car models. Continue reading Engine Mercedes M112 E32